Archives for April 2014

Small Trees for Small Spaces

We are often asked to recommend trees that don’t get too big whether it be for a specimen tree in a small space or just a small tree for the front yard.  There are many trees that fall into this category and it depends on whether you want a tree for the sun or the shade.  Listed below are several trees that would work in a small space.  For a full list and to view pictures, refer to our website Small Trees for Small Spaces.

Viridis Japanese Maple

Viridis Japanese Maple

Japanese Maples – for a yard that is shaded or partially shaded.  We have a lot of new varieties this year and many more shorter ones starting from 4 feet tall. Most of these small trees will have very interesting foliage colors in the spring, summer, and fall.  Some of these trees even have winter interest with red or yellow bark.

Red Rooster

Red Rooster Crape Myrtle

Crape Myrtles – for a yard that has partial to full sun.  Crape Myrtles have come a long way in the last few years.  There are many new dwarf varieties that resemble small bushes rather than trees, but these are perfect for supplying color throughout the summer.  The ‘Petite’ series, ‘Magic’ series, ‘Dazzle’ and ‘Early Bird’ series vary between 3-10 feet tall.  There is a large choice of flower color, so you should be able to find the perfect size plant with the perfect flower color for that small space.

Weeping Trees – Many trees have weeping versions that tend to be a lot smaller.

Weeping Cherry

Weeping Cherry

For example a ‘Snow Fountains’ Weeping Cherry reaches 8 feet.  Also, a ‘Lavender Twist’ Redbud is only 5-6 feet tall.  There is a weeping Birch 8-10 feet tall.  The trees just mentioned all lose their leaves in the fall.  If you are looking for an evergreen small tree then the Weeping Yaupon (15 feet) or the Weeping Norway Spruce (3-10 feet) may be just the trick.

There are many others such as the dwarf Gingko, dwarf Deodar Cedar, and don’t forget those beautiful star magnolias and tulip magnolias that we have just seen blooming.

Remember, refer to our website.  The trees listed there are all trees that we carry, but also speak to a Sales Associate to make sure we have the tree in stock when you are ready to purchase it.

Happy Gardening!

Tracy Davis
Horticulturist

 

April and May Upcoming Events

Chirp, Chirp!

Chirp, Chirp!

Here at The Family Tree Garden Center, we are passionate about bringing in experts, influencers and game changers in the green industry. We hope that each event that we provide gives you actionable guidance in getting your garden, lawn or home started for the spring season. Below we have included a list of our events, one is tomorrow so make sure to head over and see us!

Saturday, April 19, 10am
Mom’s Garden Tour with Southern Living Plant Collection Expert Mark Maher
We have created a beautiful garden dedicated to Mrs. Pete Pike. Walk with Mark as he points out growing habits, color combinations, and best choices of varieties.

Saturday, May 3, 10am
Dr. Allan Armitage, PHD
Need we say more??  Dr. Allan Armitage, Professor Emeritus and creator of the Trial Gardens at The University of Georgia is an author of over 10 books on Perennials, speaks all over the world, and has won countless awards in the Horticulture arena.  Don’t miss this entertaining and informative FREE seminar about All Things Perennials.

Saturday, May 10, 10am
Carmen Johnston, Better Homes & Garden Plant Collection Expert
Container garden diva extraordinaire!  One of the very best seminars we had last year!  Fun, entertaining Carmen Johnston brings container gardening to the next level for decorating any area in your home and yard.

Saturday, May 17, 10am
Lawn Insects, Pests and Controls
Join expert Allen Stone to learn how to get your lawn and garden ready for the onslaught of pest coming to take your yard from you!

Saturday, May 24, 10am-2pm
Pete Pike’s Book Signing
Have you visited the Pete Pike Museum yet to learn all about how this man went from humble beginnings to creating the largest independently owned nursery chain in the country?   Take a little piece of Atlanta’s history with you with Pete’s book written in his own “speak.”

We welcome you to come visit our team at The Family Tree! If you need information, direction or help please contact our office by calling 770-972-2470. Make sure to follow-us on Facebook ,Twitter,  Google+!

Easter Decor Ideas

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Here at The Family Tree Garden Center, we are filled with pastel decor, bunnies, decorative eggs and stylish decor for your table settings, garden or front patio this Easter. If it’s celebrating with family, friends or just enjoying it solo, we have Easter indoor and outdoor inspired decor to make your home and garden feel festive this spring. Hurry over and stock up on all our goodies!

We welcome you to come visit our team at The Family Tree! If you need information, direction or help please contact our office by calling 770-972-2470. Make sure to follow-us on Facebook ,Twitter,  Google+!

May Gardening To Do’s

May is one of the prettiest times in the garden. To keep it beautiful, you’ll just need to get out there and flowersenjoy some time in your garden.

Vegetable and Flower Garden:

  • You should have pulled up your Pansies by now and replaced them with summer annuals such as Petunias, Begonias, Vinca, Angelonia, Geraniums, Lantana, Caladiums and Coleus, just to name a few of the hundreds of varieties of beautiful annuals. If you’re using a water soluble fertilizer, apply every two weeks. Fertilize annuals with a granule fertilizer every 6-8 weeks.
  • Annual vines can provide vertical interest, but you should add a trellis to give them support.  If you’d like a tropical look in your garden, add Cannas, Elephant Ears, and Caladiums.
  • Deadheading perennials will help promote new blooms. Fall blooming asters and mums should be cut back by half this time of the year, as this will prevent them from becoming leggy.
  • Fertilize vegetables when the root system has established and the plant has grown 3-6 inches. Fruit trees also need some fertilizer. Keep a watch out for fireblight on apple and pear trees, which shows up as blackened leaves at the ends of limbs. Thin out the fruit on peach, apple, plum, and pear trees; they should have 50-70 leaves per fruit.  Immediately prune diseased branches and sterilize your pruners between cuts.

Shrubs and Trees:

  • Monitor trees and shrubs for insect and disease infestations. As the temperatures warm up and it remains dry, spider mites will be more active. Crape Myrtles may show signs of powdery mildew (a white powdery substance on the leaves); the tree can tolerate a small amount of powdery mildew, but treat with a fungicide if you think the tree is severely infected.
  • Bonide makes a quality once-a-year treatment for many tree & shrub insect and disease problems.
  • Prune flowering shrubs after they finish blooming.
  • When plants are stronger they can fight insects and diseases better. Apply a quality fertilizer according to package directions.
  • Mulch helps keep the roots a little cooler in summer months, helps retain water, and keeps weeds down. Apply a layer of mulch around trees, shrubs and flower beds for a clean, finished look.

Lawns:

  • If you haven’t fertilized your lawn yet, go ahead and do it now. If you are maintaining your lawn yourself, stop by The Family Tree and pick up a lawn calendar for your type of lawn.  This tells you when you should fertilize and apply pest control.
  • Keep fire ants under control. A good method is to treat the whole lawn with fire ant bait and then a couple of days later treat individual mounds. Be sure to read the directions, more is not always better.
  • Check the height of the blades on your lawn mower, as this needs to be adjusted as the season progresses, and make sure the blades are sharp.
  • If you are going to aerate your lawn, this is best done a few days after it has rained and when there is no rain in the forecast for several days.

We welcome you to come visit our team at The Family Tree! If you need information, direction or help please contact our office by calling 770-972-2470. Make sure to follow-us on Facebook ,Twitter,  Google+!

April Gardening To Do’s

DSCN1672April showers bring May flowers and more things to do in the garden! With spring time here for all to enjoy, The Family Tree is excited to get going on planting, trimming, and fertilizing the garden, shrubs and lawns.

Vegetable and Flower Garden:

  • Start by hardening off seedlings that you started indoors. Night-time temperatures need to be consistently above 50 degrees.
  • The Family Tree is full of beautiful spring and summer annuals – head over to see the many beautiful choices we have for your garden!
  • Beware of any late freezes, as you will have to cover newly planted summer annuals.
  • Add a quality fertilizer and soil amendment, such as mushroom compost or a planting mix when you plant your annuals for lush growth.
  • Let daffodil leaves die completely before removing. Some people like to tie them in knots but this is unnecessary.
  • Keep an eye out for aphids, who love new tender growth, especially on roses. You can blast them off with a water hose.
  • Continue to spray a fungicide on your roses every two weeks. Watch for insects, caterpillars and fungus.
  • Plant your vegetable garden now but keep an eye out for late frosts as your tomatoes and other warm season vegetables will need to be covered to protect them from the cold. Mulch tomato plants so that water doesn’t splash up onto leaves, which will help control the spread of disease.
  • Have you had your soil tested? If not, you should consider it; it will show you what kind of soil you have and what you need to add to make it the best type for your plants to thrive in.
  • Container grown fruit trees can be planted now. Fertilize pecan trees. Fertilize blueberries in second year, but don’t use nitrate fertilizers, use a special Azalea or Camellia fertilizer instead.

Shrubs and Trees:

When planting shrubs and trees, soak the root ball before you place them in the soil.  Water newly planted shrubs after you plant and then once a week, unless there is a good rain.  If you haven’t fertilized your shrubs yet, use a balanced fertilizer. Keep an eye out for lacebugs on azaleas, which will make the leaves look silvery and speckled; treat with an insecticide. Prune early blooming shrubs such as forsythia, quince, spireas, and azaleas as soon as they finish flowering for optimum bloom next year. Fertilize trees once they leaf out. Use a quality fertilizer. It is still a good time to add container grown trees and shrubs to your landscape.

Lawns:

In late April most warm season grasses will get their first application of fertilizer, and Fescue is ready for its last application. Make sure your Bermuda, Zoysia, or St. Augustine grass is at least 50 percent green before you fertilize. With Centipede grass remember to use a fertilizer with a “0” phosphorus amount; a lot of lawn fertilizers are now transitioning to this, so there are more fertilizer choices. If you are noticing lots of green patches before your lawn starts greening up, then it is probably poa annua (annual bluegrass). This will die out once the temperatures warm up, but make a mental note to apply pre-emergent in the fall to take care of this weed for next year.

We welcome you to come visit our team at The Family Tree! If you need information, direction or help please contact our office by calling 770-972-2470. Make sure to follow-us on Facebook ,Twitter,  Google+!